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Louisville's Adam Elliott warms up before the start of Game 7 of the College World Series. Weather forecasters say rain is expected Tuesday afternoon and evening.

If you’re heading to the ballpark today, bring a poncho. 

Rain is expected this afternoon and evening. Chances of precipitation will continue to increase throughout the day and could include mild thunderstorms, according to the National Weather Service.

“It looks like a soggy day,” said Brian Barjenbruch, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Valley. “It looks like rain off and on with periods of thunderstorms in there. It’ll come down heavy at times.”

Rain and lightning could threaten to delay or postpone today’s scheduled College World Series games at TD Ameritrade Park. Louisville and Auburn are scheduled to play at 1 p.m., followed by Vanderbilt and Mississippi State at 6 p.m.

Barjenbruch said the most recent forecast indicates there may be some infrequent lightning this afternoon and evening, but the potential for a damaging storm is relatively low.

“It’s not 100% out of the question that the most severe storms could produce hail,” he warned.

Wednesday should provide a brief respite from the rain, he said, but Thursday, Friday and Saturday all show a likelihood of thunderstorms.

It may seem as though the College World Series carries a rainy curse, but Barjenbruch said rain and severe thunderstorms should be expected this time of year.

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“It’s one of our best times of the year for frequent thunderstorms,” he said. “It’s close to the climatological peak for severe weather.”

This week’s rain has the potential to worsen Missouri River flooding, he said, particularly in southeast Nebraska and far southwestern Iowa.

“At this point, any moisture that falls in the Missouri River basin only adds to the water going into the river system, every drop of water from the northern Rockies on down,” Barjenbruch said. “As saturated as we have been across the entire region, it doesn’t take a whole lot (of moisture to produce a flood) compared to some of the drier years.”

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