Scott Frost, snow

Nebraska practiced outside in 28-degree weather on Wednesday morning with a 17-degree wind chill and light snow blowing at about 15 miles per hour. "NFL Playoff weather," offensive coordinator Troy Walters said.

LINCOLN — Before the Minnesota game, with the forecast showing signs of winter weather, Nebraska said they didn't plan on doing much to prepare for the elements.

Flip that script on its head.

Nebraska practiced outside in 28-degree weather Wednesday morning with a 17-degree wind chill and light snow blowing at about 15 miles per hour.

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"NFL Playoff weather," offensive coordinator Troy Walters said. "Yeah it's good for us to go out there. Saturday may be cold, may be snowing, who knows. so it's good to get out there and create some mental toughness. And the guys responded."

Nebraska was outside for two straight practices. Tuesday was cold, but Wednesday’s was much nastier.

Two reasons for the decision to go outside, Walters said. One, to build toughness.

The other, because Nebraska’s playing on a grass field in West Lafayette, Indiana, on Saturday.

“It rained a lot last week at Purdue so it may be a sloppy track, so we wanted to make sure we got out this week and practiced on the grass, got used to the elements, got used to the conditions,” Walters said. “If it is sloppy and rainy, snowy we have confidence because we prepared.”


Nebraska vs. Purdue football history

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Chris Heady covers Husker football and is the Nebraska men's basketball beat writer. He started at The World-Herald in 2017. Follow him on Twitter @heady_chris. Email: chris.heady@owh.com.

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