RHS

Toby Bergman, 13, left, and his brother Tristan, 6, walk the getting candies and turning heads at Ralston High School's second annual Halloween Safe Night.

Halloween is an opportunity for children to dress up in costumes and gorge themselves on candy.

With fun and frightening atmosphere comes a chance that something could happen to derail the holiday festivities.

According to safekids.org, on average children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than on any other day of the year.

There are some things parents and trick-or-treaters can do to ensure a safe night for everyone.

Trick-o-treaters need to look both ways when crossing the street and should only cross the street at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks.

Children should never trick-or-treat alone and if they are under 12, should go out with an adult.

For those old enough to venture out on their own, it is advised to go trick-or-treating with a group of friends and to stick to familiar, well-lit areas.

Safety on Halloween is not just about surroundings, but also the costumes children choose to wear that day.

Children should decorate their costumes and trick-or-treat bags with reflective tape and, if possible, choose bright colors.

According to a press release from the Sarpy/Cass Health Department, children should bring glow sticks or flashlights with them to see better and to be seen by drivers at night.

Masks can obstruct a child’s vision, so parents should consider face paint and makeup as alternatives whenever possible.

An additional safety measure for costumes is for parents to ensure the costume is the correct size to prevent trips and falls.

Popular trick or treating hours are 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. so drivers in the community should be more alert while driving as children who are excited on Halloween can move unpredictably on the road.

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