Virginia is for Questers. And if they eventually head west, so is Nebraska.

Papillion resident Laurel Zielinski is the new president of the Nebraska chapter of The Questers International and began her two-year term on June 1. She served previously as president of the Bellevue-based La Belle Vue chapter.

A native of Alabama, Zielinski moved to Nebraska in 2011 from Virginia, where she lived with her Air Force retiree husband, himself a native of Massachusetts.

She met The Questers, an international organization dedicated to restoring and preserving historic objects, in Virginia in 2006, and has been questing ever since.

Zielinski said she was quickly welcomed by the two Bellevue-based Quester chapters known as the La Belle Vue chapter and the Corps of Discovery chapter.

It was a timely reception, she said, since she knew no one in Nebraska other than her daughter, her Nebraska-native son-in-law, and her grandson, who were the reason Zielinski and her husband moved to the state.

What she found, Zielinski said, is a Questers organization consisting of 13 chapters across Nebraska ranging from Bellevue in the east to Scottsbluff in the west, with about 200 members.

Apart from helping to fund projects at the Sarpy County Museum, she said Nebraska Questers have helped restore the Love-Larson Opera House in Fremont, the Joslyn Castle in Omaha, the John Sautter Farmhouse in Papillion, the St. Francis Chapel in Lincoln, the Mansion on the Hill in Ogallala and the Mayhew Cabin and John Brown’s Cave in Nebraska City.

The three Scottsbluff chapters have also assisted the Legacy of the Plains Museum in Gering, she said.

“There are so many things related to Nebraska’s history that Questers have helped to restore by giving not only money but also time and volunteer work,” Zielinski said.

More information is available at nebraskaquesters.org.

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