BestOfWeekend

The World-Herald creates lots of important journalism — stories, photos, video — that is both timely and compelling. But we also know our readers are busy.

Here is a convenient roundup of some of our best work from the last several days that's worth checking out.

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It was about 15 years ago that seeds were planted for an iconic western gateway to Omaha. Fast forward to today, and the seeds have sprouted into City Council-approved plans for what could be $1.5 billion in office, commercial and residential projects on the southwest and southeast corners of 192nd and West Dodge.

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Has it been 16 years since Steve Pederson announced his North Stadium plan to catch Nebraska up with the ever-changing world of college football? That seemed like outer space stuff back then. But now, in 2019, Nebraska is quickly falling behind in the ever-escalating facility arms race.

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Legalization of industrial hemp is causing headaches for prosecutors across the state, prompting some counties to suspend prosecution of possession of small amounts of its look-alike — and high-inducing — cousin, marijuana.

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Getting permission to buy a gun in Omaha took 15 minutes and $5, writes World-Herald columnist Erin Grace. 

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The Sons of the American Revolution held a monumental ceremony this weekend at Prospect Hill Cemetery to honor historic Omahan Champion Spalding Chase.Right about now, you’re asking yourselves: “Who the heck are they? And why should I care?”

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A little more than a year ago, researcher Jamie Gehringer began developing virtual reality games that require children with developmental disabilities to perform movements that they’re asked to make during physical therapy.

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The University of Nebraska at Kearney wants to turn a vacant expanse into a trendy public-private partnership called the University Village neighborhood, similar to Omaha's Aksarben Village.

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Hannah Borg remembers the questions. What about your career? Don’t you want to get married? Don’t you have a brother? Even those in the agriculture community asked why the 22-year-old would become a sixth-generation farmer after leaving the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.