BestOfWeekend

The World-Herald creates lots of important journalism — stories, photos, video — that is both timely and compelling. But we also know our readers are busy.

Here is a convenient roundup of some of our best work from the last several days that's worth checking out.

* * * 

In college athletics, it’s called “roster management’’ — juggling head counts across all sports with a goal of attaining overall gender balance. But women’s sports advocates say the practice can also be abused, with team sizes becoming unusually large and lesser female athletes recruited to simply pad rosters. It then becomes a means to avoid adding a new women’s sport, denying women a truly meaningful college athletic opportunity.

* * *

As of 2018, women at UNO represented 53% of enrollment and 59% of athletes. That 6% margin favoring women was the sixth largest among the nearly 350 Division I schools.

* * * 

The Malmsten brothers became partners with James Cash Penney in the early 20th century when the Missouri native was building one of the nation’s most successful department store chains.

* * *

Firststar Recycling says it’s losing money after a near-collapse of the national and international markets for recycled materials. The company wants to charge the City of Omaha a tipping fee of up to $100 per ton of waste it drops off to recycle.

* * * 

Lance Pérez disputes the idea that his is an especially inspirational story. He is no different from other members of his softball team, he said, many of whom have accident and mishap stories similar to Pérez’s. For that matter, he said, he is not different from millions of human beings who face challenges of all kinds. The human spirit is resilient, he said.

* * * 

As 11-year-old Tessa Perez was taken into donor surgery on Monday, medical professionals lined the hallway at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center for a “hero walk.” Tessa, who suffered a fatal allergic reaction, was the first organ donor at the hospital to have received this recognition.

* * * 

The really old dairy barn that was in the way of a new Sarpy County housing development had a certain flair that Tim Vala didn’t want to see die. It cost him a bundle, and required some tricky maneuvering, but today that 42-foot-by-60-foot structure that dates back to about the 1880s is sitting on the Vala’s Pumpkin Patch & Apple Orchard property.