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From left, World-Herald legislative reporters Martha Stoddard, Paul Hammel and Aaron Hegarty.

The World-Herald’s Statehouse reporters round up news highlights from the Legislature and state government into the Capitol Digest — a daily briefing for the political newshound with a busy schedule.

Revenge porn and sex trafficking. A trio of measures aimed at countering sex trafficking, helping trafficking victims and fighting online “revenge porn” cleared first-round consideration Thursday in the Nebraska Legislature.

Legislative Bill 519, introduced by State Sen. Julie Slama of Peru, would give prosecutors more tools to go after those who traffic children for sex or labor. Under the bill, prosecutors could use wiretaps in investigating trafficking cases and would no longer face statutes of limitations for filing trafficking or child pornography charges.

As amended by the Judiciary Committee, the bill also spells out the kinds of damages that trafficking victims could seek in court and clarifies that child sex trafficking victims should be treated as abuse and neglect victims.

Another amendment would make it a crime for law enforcement officers to have sex with someone they have arrested or detained.

LB 630, introduced by Sen. Adam Morfeld of Lincoln, would make it a crime to threaten or harass someone by distributing sexual photos or videos of them. Such “revenge porn” gained attention earlier this year when Nebraska running back Maurice Washington was charged in California with allegedly sending a former girlfriend a video that showed her, at age 15, in sex acts with two 17-year-old boys.

The bill would make it a crime to distribute sexual photos of someone in an attempt to extort money or other valuables from them. It also would clarify laws about teenagers sending sexual photos to one another.

LB 680, introduced by Sen. Wendy DeBoer of Bennington, sets out when and how lawsuits can be filed over the disclosure of sexual photos or videos.

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Home early. Speaker of the Legislature Jim Scheer of Norfolk announced Thursday that the Nebraska Legislature will wrap up its session six days earlier than originally planned.

The last day now will be May 31, instead of June 6.

Scheer said he plans a vote on final passage of the budget Tuesday. Bills must clear first-round debate on Wednesday to have a chance of passing this year. Lawmakers will have a chance to override any gubernatorial vetoes on bills passed on May 24.

As of Thursday, state senators had passed 52 of the 107 bills designated as priorities.

Only 10 priority bills have not had at least three hours of debate.

Not everyone was happy with the early end. Omaha Sen. Justin Wayne said that too many big issues, including the state’s “crisis” in finding skilled workers, will be left unresolved by going home sooner.

Tax break for military retirees. LB 153, which would allow military retirees to pay state income tax on only half of their military retirement income, was advanced from the Revenue Committee on Thursday on a 6-1 vote.

The measure, introduced by Gordon Sen. Tom Brewer, a decorated veteran, on behalf of the governor, won’t be debated until next year because funding for the tax break was not included in the budget.

Brewer pledged to find the funding next year.

Corporate income tax cut. A bill that would lower the state’s corporate income tax rate (7.8%) so that it’s the same as the top tax rates for individuals and small businesses (6.84%) also advanced from the Revenue Committee.

The bill also attempts to fix what Elkhorn Sen. Lou Ann Linehan described as a “mistake” in a law passed last year to avoid adverse effects for state taxpayers from President Donald Trump’s tax overhaul.

Others on the committee disagreed about whether it was a mistake.

But Linehan said 37,000 tax filers in the state were penalized this year because they could not deduct more than $10,000 of their local tax payments from state income taxes. That issue, she said, deserves a debate this year.

Martha Stoddard keeps legislators honest from The World-Herald's Lincoln bureau, where she covers news from the State Capitol. Follow her on Twitter @StoddardOWH. Phone: 402-473-9583.

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