WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation’s immigration judges are alleging unfair labor practices after the Department of Justice included a blog post from a virulent anti-immigration website in a morning briefing and challenged the judges’ right to be represented by a labor union.

The union representing the country’s more than 400 immigration judges filed a pair of complaints on Friday with the Federal Labor Relations Authority. The complaints will trigger an investigation, which is what the judges, who are employees of the Department of Justice, are seeking.

Judge Ashley Tabaddor, who leads the judges’ union, said in a speech at the National Press Club on Friday that the judges’ jobs are becoming nearly impossible under Trump administration policies, forcing some into making rulings out of fear of losing their jobs.

“In the last three years and particularly in the last few weeks, the Department of Justice has taken big, dramatic and revolutionary steps to dismantle the court and strike, honestly, at the very core of the principles that we as judges and Americans hold dear,” she said.

The judges have sparred with Justice for more than a year over limits on their ability to manage ballooning dockets. Tabaddor said the case backlog had reached more than 1 million.

The filings follow a move by the Department of Justice to ask the Authority whether the union should be allowed to exist. The Department of Justice argued the judges are management officials, which the judges disputed, noting they don’t oversee anyone.

Justice officials said the morning news briefings were compiled by a contractor and the blog post should not have been included.

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

© 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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