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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Apple will continue manufacturing its Mac Pro computers in Texas after the Trump administration approved its request to waive tariffs on certain parts from China.

The commitment announced Monday clears up several months of uncertainty as Apple mulled shifting production of the Mac Pro from an Austin, Texas, plant where it has been assembling the high-end computer since 2013. In late June, the Wall Street Journal reported that Apple was on the verge of shifting the Mac Pro’s assembly line to a factory near Shanghai.

But Apple apparently had a change of heart after the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative agreed to waive tariffs on the Mac Pro parts made in China. Those tariffs could have made the Mac Pro even more expensive.

In a statement, Apple CEO Tim Cook thanked the administration for the tariff exemption.

The news is the latest twist in Apple’s trade war saga in which the company’s stock price has fluctuated wildly with President Donald Trump’s tweets about his negotiations with China. Many of Apple’s products, including its iPhone, are expected to see new restrictions this December, unless a deal with China is announced.

The Mac Pro is a niche product compared to the iPhone, iPad, laptops and watches.

The lowest-end Mac Pro starts around $6,000, and the high-end versions, with 28-core processors, could run upward of $35,000, about the price of a Tesla Model 3 electric car.

The previous version of the Mac Pro, which launched six years ago and was recently discontinued, also was built in the U.S.

This report includes material from the Washington Post.

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