Reading book coffee woman

These cold winter days can make us long for an escape. I don't think there's anything better than banishing wintertime blues with a good book.

So moms, grab a fuzzy blanket, a hot cup of tea and one of these six recommended reads:

1. “All We Ever Wanted” by Emily Giffin. Author of “Something Borrowed” and “First Comes Love,” Giffin is my go-to author when it comes to books. “All We Ever Wanted” just might be her best to date. An incredibly well-written and timely read, the book focuses on themes of privilege, self-knowledge, forgiveness and family, as well as racism, classism and sexism. It's powerful and poignant with real, relatable and raw characters.

2. “Conversations with Friends” by Sally Rooney. This book came recommended by Sarah Jessica Parker via Instagram. I could not put it down. This fascinating story from Rooney captivates audiences by examining the human condition and the complexity of relationships. This sharp, thought-provoking book centers around two women figuring out how to navigate the vulnerability and pain of adulthood.

3. “My Not So Perfect Life” by Sophie Kinsella. If I’m in the mood for a fun, flirty, feel-good read, Sophie Kinsella is my girl. This book did not disappoint, bringing the wit, warmth and wisdom typical of Kinsella novels. “My Not So Perfect Life” is a contemporary tale about presenting the perfect life when the reality is far from the truth. Themes of love, identity, honesty are at the forefront of this story.

4. “Love Poems for Married People” by John Kenney. This hilarious collection of poetry is relatable for anyone who’s in a long-term relationship. Full of wit, observation and reality, these poems cover everything from parental complaints to fading sex lives. Kenney's sharp humor remind readers exactly what it's like to spend the rest of your life with the person you love.

5. “Eligible” by Curtis Sittenfeld. A modern retelling of Jane Austin’s “Pride and Prejudice,” this story deals with gender, class, courtship and family drama. Sittenfeld’s book retains the original’s characteristics while bringing it effortlessly to the now, including a penchant for reality television. This book is irresistible, beguiling and charming.

6. “About a Boy” by Nick Hornby. An oldie but a goodie, this is one of my favorite books of all time. Hornby, known for his novel, “High Fidelity,” brings a dry British humor to this acerbic tale. “About a Boy” contains heavy topics including depression, loss, loneliness, bullying, divorce and suicide, but meets them with heart and compassion. Hornby creates an unexpected coming-of-age tale with this book.

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Shea Saladee lives in Papillion with her husband, Brent, and their three children. She works as an instructor at the University of Nebraska Omaha.

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