Not long ago, social media exploded over “Sharknado,” a thoroughly cheesy campfest blending sharks, a tornado, Ian Ziering, Tara Reid and a now-legendary sequence of a chainsaw-carrying Ziering leaping into a giant shark and rescuing a previously consumed woman by carving her out.

Endless replays have followed, along with merchandise, showings of “Sharknado” in theaters, and a planned sequel.

Before then, welcome “Ghost Shark,” premiering at 8 p.m. CDT Thursday.

The notables in “Ghost Shark” are “Night Court's” Richard Moll and “7th Heaven's” Mackenzie Rosman. But when it comes to simple cinematic quality, “Ghost Shark” is on a par with “Sharknado,” just not as hilariously extreme. If you accept “Sharknado” as transcendently terrible, “Ghost Shark” ends up merely terrible.

The film begins with a fishing competition; when two contestants' possibly prize-winning catch is eaten by a shark, they variously shoot and abuse the shark before killing it. But instead of going to a watery grave, the shark returns as a ghost — a translucent, glowing one that is intent on revenge on humans by severing limbs, biting off heads and causing terror all over the place.

Said places include a beach where a group of young people (Rosman among them) have gathered. But — spoiler alert — because this is a shark that is also a ghost, it can show up anywhere there is water. Let your imagination run wild. The filmmakers did.

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