When 'everything changed,' an Omaha man defined himself by hope, ambition — not paralysis

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When 'everything changed,' an Omaha man defined himself by hope, ambition — not paralysis
Doug, Connie, Madi, Evan

Doug is a great dad, the kind who calmed a fussy newborn by walking him around the neighborhood in the middle of the night, the kind who arrived with snacks in the minivan for the swim team carpool.

Dr. William Thorell

Dr. William Thorell

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Janelle quote
Janelle Hansen

Janelle Hansen

Driving simulator

Kyley Callahan introduced Doug to a driving simulator, where he began to learn to drive again, using hand controls, instead of his feet, to push the brake and gas pedals. She helped him to learn to transfer in and out of bed, and she worked with him to strengthen his hands.

Circuit board

Doug speaks of his recovery in terms of “benchmarks,” a word he uses to describe his work with industrial-scale electrical panels. “I’ve been able to progress every week and meet benchmarks,” he said.

Brad Dexter and Doug White

Brad Dexter, a physical therapist at QLI, works with Doug White during a recent therapy session.

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