Starbucks has joined the color-changing food fad and released a limited edition Unicorn Frappuccino.

It’s the perfect addition to every teenage girl’s Instagram — but as you might guess, not to a balanced diet.

The Unicorn Frappuccino is made with pink powder, mango syrup and a blue drizzle. When stirred it changes from pink to purple and the taste changes from sweet and fruity to tangy and tart. It’s also caffeine-free.

For a grande version — that’s 16 ounces — made with whole milk and topped with whipped cream, the drink is 410 calories. And with 59 grams of sugar, the Unicorn Frappuccino packs as much of the sweet stuff as six Krispy Kreme glazed doughnuts.

For those on the Weight Watchers program, a grande will use up 22 SmartPoints. Many people are alloted 30 points daily.

Registered dietitian Niki Kubiak classified the drink as a dessert. A sugar rush is almost guaranteed, she said.

“It will hit your bloodstream in a concentrated way and then it will leave you tired and sometimes hungry,” said Kubiak, the director of nutrition and health at Infinite Sports World in Ralston.

In a grande, there is also 16 grams of fat — of that, 10 grams are saturated fat. Kubiak, who contributes for livewellnebraska.com, said 10 grams of saturated fat is the daily recommendation.

“There is a lot of fat in this drink, and it isn’t the good kind,” she said. “If you drink it once, it probably isn’t a bad idea, but if you’re having it regularly it would not fit into a healthy diet.”

The Starbucks in downtown Omaha sold between 20 and 30 Unicorn Frappuccinos on Wednesday. The store typically sells around 80 Frappuccinos of any kind per day, the baristas told us.

Yuliana Soltero, 30, normally orders a plain iced coffee but decided to try the Unicorn Frappuccino on Thursday, because she saw the drink all over social media.

“I was expecting it to taste more sugary than it is,” Soltero said from the downtown store. “It does get more sour the more I drink it, though.”

The color and flavor-changing drink is only available until Sunday or when supplies run out.

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