There’s one rightful heir to this Iron Throne.

But first, they’ll have to shed a little blood.

The American Red Cross has partnered with HBO’s “Game of Thrones” to award a full-size throne replica to one lucky blood donor. The partnership was designed to encourage donations during April, which is national volunteer month.

The Red Cross is stressing the importance of donations, especially in light of flooding in Nebraska and Iowa. Because of flood-related road and building closures, the organization had to cancel more than 500 blood donation appointments in the area.

Those who donate blood to the Red Cross by April 30 will be automatically entered for a chance to win the throne. At appointments between Thursday and April 30, donors will receive a commemorative “Bleed for the Throne” poster, while supplies last.

If you’re the lucky winner to give the throne a new home, clear some space. The throne itself measures more than 7 feet high and more than 5 feet wide. So about as big as The Mountain.

The seat clocks in at about 310 pounds. The base it sits on is about 10 feet around and weighs about 575 pounds.

A winner will be selected in early May, which means they might get their new throne before the series finale airs on May 19.

HBO had teamed up with the Red Cross in March to give away “Game of Thrones” T-shirts, too. Nationally, that helped the organization bring in about 60,000 new blood donors, said Samantha Pollard, communications manager for blood services in the Midwest Region.

“It’s a great partnership to get new donors excited,” Pollard said. “It introduces the concept of blood donation to people who maybe hadn’t considered it before.”

Make an appointment by downloading the Red Cross Blood Donor app, visiting redcrossblood.org or by calling 1-800-733-2767.

Long may you reign, winner. Long may you reign.

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