20191122_new_cprkiosk

The kiosk, available to the public at Westroads Mall, plays brief introduction and overview videos on hands-only CPR.

The American Heart Association can’t help you find that perfect Christmas gift at the mall.

But thanks to a new kiosk, the group can help you practice hands-only CPR.

The organization on Thursday unveiled the kiosk at Westroads Mall.

The kiosk, available to the public, plays brief introduction and overview videos on hands-only CPR. Then users can practice and take a 30-second test with the help of a practice mannequin. After the test, the kiosk will give users feedback on their CPR performance.

The machine is the first of its kind in the state, officials with the American Heart Association said. It was made possible thanks to an anonymous donor, said Jennifer Redmond, the organization’s executive director. The $375,000 donation covered the cost of the kiosk, among other things.

“It’s giving them the tools and knowledge they need to learn CPR in the event of an emergency,” Redmond said.

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According to the organization, studies show that hands-only CPR can be as effective as mouth-to-mouth CPR, and people are more likely to feel comfortable performing it.

The kiosk, located on the northwest side of the mall’s first floor, does not certify users in CPR, but it will score your performance at the end. It rates hand placement, depth of compressions and speed, all of which are important in the process.

The entire demonstration and hands-on practice session take about five minutes, Redmond said. The kiosk is free to use, and people can take the practice portion as many times as they like.

Redmond said they would like to place more kiosks in high-traffic spots around the city and state in the future.

“Our ultimate goal is to save and change lives in our community,” Redmond said. “There’s no greater gift than the gift of life. If we’re able to change and save a person’s life by teaching this skill, it’s a win-win.”

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