USA Today published its annual report on college athletics spending Thursday, and Nebraska reported $112,142,961 in revenue in 2015-16 and $103,745,775 in expenses.

Those numbers put Nebraska in the top 25 nationally among athletic departments, with NU ranking 22nd in revenue and 24th in spending.

The new data show a continued trend upward in both revenue and expenses for Nebraska. NU's athletic department revenue grew by nearly $10 million compared to 2014-15 and expenses increased by about $5.7 million.

These totals show Nebraska profited by about $8.4 million in 2015-16, which is more than double the amount NU profited the year prior. Nebraska had a profit of about $4.1 million in 2014-15, according to USA Today.

Nebraska surpassed $100 million in revenue for the first time in 2014-15.

Nebraska's revenue and expenses for the most recent fiscal year both rank eighth in the Big Ten. Ohio State is the conference's biggest money-maker with $170.8 million in revenue, which ranks the Buckeyes third nationally.

The Big Ten teams, with revenue and expenses, ranked by total revenue:

Ohio State: $170.8 million revenue, $166.8 million expenses

Michigan: $163.9 million revenue, $157.9 million expenses

Wisconsin: $132.8 million revenue, $130.4 million expenses

Penn State: $132.2 million revenue, $129.3 million expenses

Michigan State: $123 million revenue, $121.9 million expenses

Minnesota: $113.5 million revenue, $110.7 million expenses

Iowa: $113.2 million revenue, $116.2 million expenses

Nebraska: $112.1 million revenue, $103.7 million expenses

Illinois: $96.2 million revenue, $102.9 million expenses

Indiana: $95.2 million revenue, $94.2 million expenses

Maryland: $94.1 million revenue, $94.1 million expenses

Rutgers: $83.9 million revenue, $83.9 million expenses

Purdue: $78.7 million revenue, $78.8 million expenses

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