HISTORY

Oscar Wilde


Feb. 14, 1849: President James K. Polk became the first U.S. chief executive to be photographed while in office as he posed for Matthew Brady in New York City.

1778: The American ship Ranger carried the recently adopted Stars and Stripes to a foreign port for the first time as it arrived in France.

1859: Oregon was admitted to the Union as the 33rd state.

1895: Oscar Wilde's final play, "The Importance of Being Earnest," opened at the St. James's Theatre in London. 1903: The Department of Commerce and Labor was established.

1912: Arizona became the 48th state of the Union as President William Howard Taft signed a proclamation.

1924: The Computing-Tabulating-Recording Co. of New York was formally renamed International Business Machines Corp., or IBM.

1929: The "St. Valentine's Day Massacre" took place in a Chicago garage as seven rivals of Al Capone's gang were gunned down.

1941: The Carson McCullers novel "Reflections in a Golden Eye," previously serialized, was published in book form by Houghton Mifflin.

1946: The film noir "Gilda," starring Rita Hayworth, was released by Columbia Pictures.

1962: First lady Jacqueline Kennedy conducted a televised tour of the White House in a videotaped special that was broadcast on CBS and NBC.

1975: Anglo-American author P.G. Wodehouse, 93, died in Southampton, New York.

1989: Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini called on Muslims to kill Salman Rushdie, author of "The Satanic Verses," a novel condemned as blasphemous.

"We are effectively destroying ourselves by violence masquerading as love.

"R.D. Laing, Scottish psychiatrist (1927-1989)

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